The Bad Miss Bennett: DNF p. 133 - "Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted...!"

The Bad Miss Bennet: A Novel - Jean Burnett

You know, I've finished some really bad P&P pastiches. One, which I can't remember the name of anymore, I threw across the room when I closed the cover. I even completed Mr. Darcy, Vampyre, all the while all but crying that I'd actually spent money on the thing. (I'm still trying to work myself up to re-reading it, as when I read it the first time I was not writing reviews. I just can't bring myself to do it.) I've read the good, the bad, and now...I'm giving up on the really ugly.

 

I'll admit, this book already had a strike against it going in; I simply can't stand Lydia. I know she was young and she could have maybe made something of herself...but I don't think so. I sadly think her personality was set and worse, she was about to bring Kitty down with her. She never shows any remorse or even understanding about anything but her own self-indulgence. I've always thought that, sadly, she and Wickham deserve each other. Only one pastiche gave her plausible growth as a character...and even then it partially does so by making you feel sorry for her before her desire to change.

 

Needless to say, I wasn't expecting much...but my expectations were still too high. Not only was this from her POV - something I could have easily done without - but she's even worse then she was before. If the Darcys had an inkling what she was thinking and planning, they'd lock her away for their own protection! Her plans are even more audacious then Wickham's...and often even more ill-conceived. By the time we get to Bath and find a dead foreigner on her lounge in the rooms her potential paramour...I didn't want to see how much further down this story was going to go. The blurb on the cover mentions something about HRH and the way this is going, I simply don't want to know.

 

I am keeping this one my list of books that are in the library, as I might try to finish it at some point when I'm in a slightly more amiable mood. For now, I'm off to read some good Austen and pastiches of her.